ginasketch: (nine lives parody)
Because I haven't done one in EONS. Mainly because I've been busy with work and the book, but since the book isn't happening now, I can show you guys this, which was one of my personal faves (an Atlas moth). You can click on it for a bigger version:





Also some Trekkie fan art which is the first thing I've drawn just for myself in about a year )

Yay!

Jun. 10th, 2011 01:21 pm
ginasketch: (batty)
So remember a while back the curator of Entomology said he wanted me to write and illustrate an article for his Entomology blog?

Well It's up! And it includes a painting I did of a weevil.

Yay!

Jun. 10th, 2011 01:21 pm
ginasketch: (batty)
So remember a while back the curator of Entomology said he wanted me to write and illustrate an article for his Entomology blog?

Well It's up! And it includes a painting I did of a weevil.
ginasketch: (squidlet)
Stipple drawing of a dung beetle from the New Forest (It's not quite finished):






Life sized:









ginasketch: (squidlet)
Stipple drawing of a dung beetle from the New Forest (It's not quite finished):






Life sized:









ginasketch: (pilot satan)
Mainly entomological stuff. First of all, a Peach Blossom moth resting, and with wings spread. A British species





One more. In sepia tones )
ginasketch: (pilot satan)
Mainly entomological stuff. First of all, a Peach Blossom moth resting, and with wings spread. A British species





One more. In sepia tones )
ginasketch: (FROGGIE)
Entomology art class week four. Today we used microscopes to draw close up of the beetles. Click on the thumbnail to see the full image.





It's a rose chafer beetle. We also had a talk about science, art and observation by scientist Dr. Adrian Rundle. I think this has been my favorite class so far. The next one will be in two weeks, and we'll be using the microscopes again.



ginasketch: (FROGGIE)
Entomology art class week four. Today we used microscopes to draw close up of the beetles. Click on the thumbnail to see the full image.





It's a rose chafer beetle. We also had a talk about science, art and observation by scientist Dr. Adrian Rundle. I think this has been my favorite class so far. The next one will be in two weeks, and we'll be using the microscopes again.



ginasketch: (maggies)
A painting of an African Fruit Scarab. Click through to a larger image:




More behind the cut )
ginasketch: (maggies)
A painting of an African Fruit Scarab. Click through to a larger image:




More behind the cut )
ginasketch: (Default)
I was exhausted when this class happened due to health problems, but it was fun just the same.


More... )

Beetle specimens
ginasketch: (Default)
I was exhausted when this class happened due to health problems, but it was fun just the same.


More... )

Beetle specimens
ginasketch: (maggies)




MOAR )

Now, it's time for bed. I'm utterly exhausted and there is Friday to go.
ginasketch: (maggies)




MOAR )

Now, it's time for bed. I'm utterly exhausted and there is Friday to go.
ginasketch: (demons)
Fulgorids are some of my favorite insects. They look like almost cartoon-like with their strange heads and bright colours.




Though fulgoridae may look moth or butterfly-like, they are not related. These are from the order Hemiptera. When Carl Linnaeus was naming specimens, he was told by scientific illustrator Maria Sibylla Merian that the large protusions some tropical fulgoridae have lit up. This has never been verified, and is likely untrue, but Linnaeus took it at face value and named them Lantern Flies (or variations on this term in latin).

I saw some of Merian's Peanut-Headed bug (Fulgora laternaria) drawings at the Amazing Rare Things exhibition last year. It is thought that its strange head is meant to mimic a snake or lizard.

As usual you can click for a larger image.
ginasketch: (demons)
Fulgorids are some of my favorite insects. They look like almost cartoon-like with their strange heads and bright colours.




Though fulgoridae may look moth or butterfly-like, they are not related. These are from the order Hemiptera. When Carl Linnaeus was naming specimens, he was told by scientific illustrator Maria Sibylla Merian that the large protusions some tropical fulgoridae have lit up. This has never been verified, and is likely untrue, but Linnaeus took it at face value and named them Lantern Flies (or variations on this term in latin).

I saw some of Merian's Peanut-Headed bug (Fulgora laternaria) drawings at the Amazing Rare Things exhibition last year. It is thought that its strange head is meant to mimic a snake or lizard.

As usual you can click for a larger image.
ginasketch: (demons)
Sadly though both Nyarly and Fred are still alive, they have both shredded their wings on their late night egg laying jaunts through my room. I'm happy they are still alive and quite active, but sad because I had hoped to preserve them when they died. I might be able to salvage parts of the wings but that's it.

I had ordered a bunch of entomological setting equipment for this purpose. I'd rather it not go to waste, so I ordered a dry unmounted Atlas Moth from the same guy.






This is probably more ideal, as the specimen is completely dry and I am a beginner. So I will need to relax it, then set it again with its wings open.
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